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It's That Time Again
September 05, 2017
Hi,

(Giant Swallowtail Butterfly.)

North America, I hope you enjoyed a pleasant Labor Day weekend.

Our Prayers continue for the millions affected by the floods of Harvey.

Yes, we must pray and rely on Him, as we live in a fallen world.

We must learn to rely on Him.



(I'll hide behind this tree, he can't see me then.)

This past week Karen's mom passed away.

She was 93 years old.

Sadly, the last few years she wasn't mom.

Now comes a time for all to heal.

I'm concerned for Karen however, she still hasn't had a good cry.

But, I know a large burden has been lifted from Karen.

So much for a last hurrah to summer this year.

It seems to be a right of passage, when September comes and kids are off to school, we get a bit of a heat wave.

Not this year.

No last visits to the beach.

Jeans weather instead, according to the forecast.

Nothing I can control, might as well make the most of it all.

Thank you all for your kind words on last week's letter on 'Native Grasses'.

Native Plants Rock.

Thank you all for your well wishes on the fur babies.

We are happy to report that Akita and Snickers are back to normal.

Snicker Doodles even gets some play time with the kitties again.

It's That Time Again.

Time to think of migrations.

This week it is preparing for Hummingbird migration.

Enjoy.

Hummers:

The Western Hemisphere is the only place on earth you will find hummingbirds.

Yes, we are blessed to have these diminutive beauties, even if only a few short months.

Ruby-throated hummingbirds seem to be every where.

Rubies are the only hummer to breed in the eastern portion of North America.

This time of year, my yard is very busy with the little gems.

My feeders get enough action for close up views, but it is the flower gardens that get the real action.

Hummers like all wild birds, prefer to find food the natural way.

Even though your feeders offer a non stop buffet, they prefer to fly from flower to flower.

It's the way God made them.

Hummingbirds will remain here through most of September (most years).

Even into October on occassion.

My yard is full of hummer favorites.

Red salvia, Black and blue salvia, butterfly bushes, petunia pots, phlox, etc.

Various tall phlox, hibiscus, monarda still in bloom, and other flowering plants offer the hummers (local and migrators), a nice choice for sugar rich nectar.

Zinnias and other flowers that attract tiny insects, also attract insect eating hummers.

They need protein too.

Plan and plant ahead, and you too may be rewarded with Hummingbirds.

It isn't simply about feeders this time of year (remember to keep them clean and filled).

Along the Pacific Northwest, some of Anna's Hummingbird will winter over, enjoying flowers and your feeders.

The same goes for parts of the southwest, and many vagrants hangout in the deep south over winter.

Find Your Hummingbird Species Profiles.

Although, as hummers head south and more and more arrive, feeders play an increasingly important roll,

especially as habitat continues to shrink.

Until Rubies and some other species hit the trail, they are still protecting their territory and attempt to keep other hummers from invading their food sources.

Not until migration begins, will they tolerate each other at feeders, and flower beds.

Hummingbirds don't flock as most species will do for migration.

Hummingbirds migrate, to each its own Nature's given time.

No older birds to follow.

Then, the funnel effect comes into play as they head toward the border.

'It's that Time Again'.

Pay Attention Now.

This is when you want to pump your nectar (sugar) water up from 4 parts to 1, to 3 parts water to 1 part sugar

Many flowers offer 33% and up to 50% nectar, and 3 to 1 is actually closer in nectar, than 4 to 1 is.

It doesn't hurt the birds.

You will however, have to clean your feeders more often in warmer weather, as sugar water will turn rancid quicker.

Indeed, it helps them to bulk up for the long trip South.

You may find Feeding Hummingbirds, and Hummingbird Migration South helpful.

You will find how heading south is often a trip of leisure.

The tiny birds often take their time, stopping to gorge and rest for a few days.

Maybe in you flowers and at your feeders.

Plan your flowers gardens to offer nectar rich flowers for late in the season.

My go to flowers are sages and salvias.

You can't go wrong with these all season bloomers.

(These three pictures were again taken in auto click. As fast as the camera can click, you see how the wings move.)

You will find how heading south is often a trip of leisure.

The tiny birds often take their time, stopping to gorge and rest for a few days.

Maybe in you flowers and at your feeders.

Plan your flowers gardens to offer nectar rich flowers for late in the season.

My go to flowers are sages and salvias.

You can't go wrong with these all season bloomers.

(These three pictures were again taken in auto click. As fast as the camera can click, you see how the wings move.)

Only north bound is dictated on hormones, and often birds are caught in some bad weather conditions yet feel the need to move on.

Yup, those hormones can even get birds in a lot of trouble :-)

As cold weather kills off flowers, some hummers are slow to migrate (often the juveniles).

It is always wise to keep the feeders out a good couple weeks past your last normal sighting.

You may be pleasantly surprised with a late season visitor.

Well, it is time to fly for now.

Before I go, here is your positive thought for the week.

God Bless.

"There is only one corner of the universe you can be certain of improving, and that's your own self".

Aldous Huxley (1864-1963)

English Novelist

Hitting the nail on the head, don't you think?

Now here is some help from the word of God.

"Do nothing out of selfish ambition or vain conceit.

Rather, in humility value others above yourselves,

not looking to your own interests but each of you to the interests of the others".

Philippians 2:3-4

"Treat the earth well:

It was not given to you by your parents,

It was loaned to you by your children.

We do not inherit the Earth from our

Ancestors, we borrow it from our Children."

Ancient Indian Proverb.

Your friend indeed,

Ron Patterson



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Gardening For Wildlife.


























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