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Go Native, Your Wildlife Will Thank You
June 03, 2019
Hi,

The beginning of a new month.

It's June already..............

(Columbines)

Where does the time go?

Spring has been well below normal temperature and above average moisture.

At least that's been the case in SW. Michigan.

Everything is planted.

Some seeds I think must be replanted as seeds will rot if the ground is too cool and wet, and it has been.

Brandy got her Rabies shot this past Wednesday.

She was also treated for an ear infection.

The poodle pup is now four months old and taking advantage of her being taller and more athletic than Snick, Snick.

It's time to deep clean the feeders and stations.

A thorough scrubbing and sanitizing is in order and by making it a habit to do on the first of the month, you wont forget because you have developed a good habit to keep things clean.

If possible, you may want to move your feeders a few feet so fecal matter and seeds don't pile up and cause more potential issue at ground level.

It is always a good idea to spray your feeders with rubbing alcohol on a weekly basis to kill off germs and fungus that grow on the outside of a feeder.

Deep cleaning gets to the bottom and helps to prevent sickness from tainted feed and seed.

Remember to keep your hummer feeders cleaned and there is really no need to fill your feeders unless you are really blessed and have several hummingbirds visit you.

Too often we will fill a hummer feeder and let it go because it isn't empty enough.

Sugar water goes bad and there it sits.

Use just enough nectar so you see the level and know the hummers are coming.

Anything more is a waste.

No need to fill a feeder every time, when just a bit is licked up.

I use 4 oz. feeders and they aren't filled (pictured).

Still I have to clean and replace the sugar water.

Why dump 8-12 ounces every 3 days?

Read up on Hummingbird Feeders.

When you are shopping and planning for your gardens, remember to look for plants that attract certain kinds of wildlife that you want.

Do your homework.

Ask questions.

Don't attempt to attract something that isn't in your region, even though you want to have a certain bird or butterfly visit.

Are you attracting hummingbirds, certain butterflies?

Honeybees, and more important, native bees.

Plant hummingbird flowers.

Most are a tubular shape.

Butterfly flowers and host plants.

Flowers with wide heads or multiple little blooms that form a head.

Zinnias, sunflowers and such.

Milkweed for all pollinators, and the host for the regal Monarch Butterflies.

(Hyssop for hummers.)

Plan and Plant.

Ground covers for young animals and birds

Evergreen trees and shrubs for protection from predators and the elements.

Go native,

Native plants not only perform better and are healthier, they offer food for insects, that feed all of your birds.

Natives as a rule, require less water and upkeep.

There truly are some wonderful natives to have in your garden.

While I do have a few non-natives like Bearded Iris, Crocosmia, Black and Blue salvia, and even a French lilac bush, other perennials and shrubs are native.

Phlox, Hibiscus, Columbine, Monarda, Coreopsis, and Lupine.

Four different species of Liatris, Eupatorium, Cup Plant, Prairie dock, Milkweed, and several others.

Yes, most annuals are non-native, they are more for looks and to feed pollinators.

Shrubs like Ninebark, Viburnums, Winterberry, Aronia, Elderberry, and a few others offer food for pollinators, fruits and seeds for birds and small mammals, and will host a few butterflies.

Native fruits that supply the native wildlife the nutrients and such, they really need.

I also have several species of native Grasses for the wildlife.

You can also find plants that are region, or locally specific.

(Swamp Milkweed)

Shrubs like Ninebark, Viburnums, Winterberry, Aronia, Elderberry, and a few others offer food for pollinators, fruits and seeds for birds and small mammals, and will host a few butterflies.

Native fruits that supply the native wildlife the nutrients and such, they really need.

I also have several species of native Grasses for the wildlife.

You can also find plants that are region, or locally specific.

Native plants also offer more than one season of beauty.

Besides flowers, Shrubs For the Wildlife Garden may offer attractive fruit, followed by colorful fall foliage.

Some even offer a fourth season of color or interesting bark to liven a dull winter scene (think Red-bark dogwood).

You get the idea.

Well, it is time to fly for now.

Before I go, here is your positive thought for the week.

God Bless.

"If there is one thing upon this earth that mankind love and admirebetter than another, it is a brave man, -- it is the man who dares tolook the devil in the face and tell him he is a devil."

James A. Garfield

Not only look the devil in the face, through the power in the name of Jesus we can cause the enemy some pain.

I like that.

Jesus turned and said to Peter, "Get behind me, Satan! You are a stumbling block to me; you do not have in mind the concerns of God, but merely human concerns."

Matthew 16:23

"Very truly I tell you, whoever believes in me will do the works I have been doing, and they will do even greater things than these, because I am going to the Father."

John 14:12

"Treat the earth well:

It was not given to you by your parents,

It was loaned to you by your children.

We do not inherit the Earth from our

Ancestors, we borrow it from our Children."

Ancient Indian Proverb.



A Blessed week to you .

Your friend indeed,

Ron Patterson



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Gardening For Wildlife.


























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